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Burris AR-F3
    Burris AR-F3
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    • Burris AR-F3
      Ratings Snapshot
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      out of 5
      5 (0)
      4 (1)
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      1 (0)
      Would recommend this product.
      100%
      SKU: 126-BUR-300215
      UPC: 000381302199
      Manufacturer: Burris
      MFG#: Burris 300215

    • MSRP: $359.00
      $299.00

      Quantity in Basket:  None

    •  

    Burris AR-F3 Red Dot - 300215

    Some people describe Burris AR-F3 as a combination of the mount, protective housing, and spare parts storage room. In simple words, this item from Burris catalog presents the most useful and versatile mount for the FastFire II and FastFire III red dots available on the market. The AR-F3 allows the shooter to mount both FF versions on AR rifles flattop standalone or as a co-witness for its iron sights enabling him proper head/eye position without having to play with adding risers.

    As it’s known, the mini reflex sight FastFire 3 (like many other mini red dots) has a lower optical axis than full-size RDS (i.e. an axis closer to the bore). It means that on a flat-top AR-15 type rifle, where you need plenty of sight height anyway, this is no benefit. But, Burris make the right move by offering a combo with the Fastfire III and a riser mount to put it at the correct height for an M16/ AR platform.

    For AR and carbine shooters, the AR-F3 is a must have red dot accessory if they want an AR mount for their FastFire 2 or 3. Also known as a "rabbit ears," the AR-F3 with its high metal sides fully protect the Fastfire sight from impact, while the sight base will help prevent accidental dents on the actual optic.

    As it earlier said the lower compartment offers convenient storage for a Torx and open-end wrench and as well as spare battery, but shooter need to remove the sight in order to access an extra battery. Though packed in the protective cage the FastFire 3 keeps the slim profile preventing the sight from being a snag hazard when carried under clothing making this combo one of the most affordable and most appropriate solutions for multi-gun shooters.

    Features and Benefits of the Burris AR-F3:

    • Bundles a FastFire III 3-MOA sight with the rugged AR-F3 mount, creating a convenient package for first-time FastFire owners
    • Protects FastFire optics
    • Ideal for multi-gun shooters
    • The mount’s height is sufficient to co-witness with flip-up sights
    • Bright red dot allows for fast target acquisition and easy aiming
    • Compact and lightweight, so it won’t affect firearm balance or handling
    • 1x magnification allows both-eyes-open shooting, for enhanced awareness and target acquisition
    • Parallax-free, for better accuracy
    • Fits any Weaver or Picatinny-style base for easy mounting
    • Windage and elevation adjustments make fine-tuning easy
    • Easy access to illumination controls
    • High-grade optical glass provides excellent brightness and clarity, with lasting durability
    • Index-matched, Hi-Lume® multicoating provides low-light performance and glare elimination
    • Waterproof
    • Durable and rugged, with shockproof design that stands up to years of punishing recoil
    • Features a compartment for carrying a spare battery and open-end wrench or Torx® wrench
    • Comes with our Burris Forever Warranty

     


    The distinction between inferior quality and premium Fastfire mount undeniable. At MSP, we only offer mounts from the most trusted brands like Burris Optics. Buy with confidence that we stand behind the product we sell.

     
    Specifications
    Item Number 300215
    Reticles FastFire™ 3-MOA Dot
    Reticle Color(s) Red
    Kit no
    Clear Objective Lens Diameter 21x15 mm
    Finish Matte
    Mount Picatinny Rail Base
    Eye Relief Unlimited
    Click Value 1 MOA
    Elevation Adjustment, Total Capability 115 MOA
    Windage Adjustment 86 MOA
    Parallax/Focus Parallax-free
    Length 2 in.
    Weight 4.6 oz.
    Illumination Control Manual push-button & automatic brightness adjustment
    Illumination Settings 3 manual brightness levels; automatic setting reactive to environment
    Battery CR1632

    Customer Ratings & Reviews

    1
    Ratings Snapshot
    4.0
    out of 5
    5 (0)
    4 (1)
    3 (0)
    2 (0)
    1 (0)
    Would recommend this product.
    100%
    4.0
    out of 5
    5 (0)
    4 (1)
    3 (0)
    2 (0)
    1 (0)
    Would recommend this product.
    100%
    1 Total Reviews
    • 1

    FastFire III 3 MOA w/AR-F3 Picatinny Mount

    4 out of 5
    Location:
    Date: April 8, 2020

    Burris Fastfire II red dot optic with the AR-3F mount. I specifically ordered the Fastfire and mount to test and review for my blog fans and followers, as well as all of you firearm enthusiasts out there. I have had my eye on the Burris series of optics for some time and was especially attracted to the Fastfire models. Not only because they were small, but because they were super lightweight and seemed to have nothing but positive reviews from other shooters. After reviewing several EOTechs, Aimpoints, and Trijicon optics, I felt it was time to slow it down and review a more affordable optic that almost anyone could purchase and use. When I began looking through the selection of Fastfire models, I was surprised to see how many different applications they had a use for. The most common Fastfires mount to a standard Picatinny rail, but they also offer models for shotguns, Glocks, 1911's, and other great applications. Not only that, but that had a ton of different mounts available to fit any shooter's needs depending on their chosen platform and environment. I decided that I wanted to pair my Fastfire up with my VLTOR 300 Blackout but later found myself using it on most of my other rifles as well. So Because I decided initially that it would be mounted to an AR-15 style platform, I decided on the Fastfire II with the AR-3F mount. And of course, as always, I ordered from my most trusted source for my firearm needs, www.brownells.com. What is the AR-F3 mount? Good, you asked, because even if you didn't, I was going to tell you anyway. Due to the small and lightweight nature of the Fastfire, I can only imagine that if unprotected and dropped, there was a good possibility that it could get easily damaged…especially if dropped on concrete or a hard surface. The Burris AR-F3 has many different features, but the one I was most attracted to was the protection it offered the optic itself. The AR-F3 mount is technically a riser as a whole but still allows the optic itself to sit low inside the mount. This makes co-witness of your front and rear iron sights possible. When the optic is mounted securely inside the mount, the actual optic is protected by two metal wings on both sides of the mount, which sit slightly higher than the top portion of the lens. This acts as a barrier between the fragile optic/lens and something hard like concrete or an unintentional move that could cause damage or failure. Because I use most of my rifles in a competition environment, I needed protection for the optic. I often found myself throwing my rifle to the ground during competition or just being generally rough with it. So the Burris AR-F3 was perfect for me and my use. But protection and co-witnessing wasn't the only thing this great little optic offered. In the largest portion of the mount, you will find a large compartment with a hard foam insert. Inside of the foam, there are several tools and a spare battery compartment. I had no idea it was even there when I first ordered, and after it arrived, it turned out to be a nice little surprise. There were several tools inside, including a specialty Allen key used to adjust the windage and elevation of the 4 MOA amber-colored dot. The Allen key has a flathead driver on one side for windage and elevation adjustments and a Torx head on the other end for mounting or un-mounting of the optic body from the AR-F3 mount. In addition to the Allen tool, there is also an open-end wrench that is used to mount or un-mount the entire Fastfire/AR-F3 from your rifle. Although a spare battery was not included, there is a space available in the foam for a spare. So essentially, Burris has done an excellent job of making this package self-sufficient. No need to have extra tools or batteries on hand in a separate place. The overall weight of the Fastfire II without the mount is approximately .9 ounces! Not bad for an entire optic set-up, including the mount, especially seeing how the optics itself is made of stainless steel, bronze, and anodized aluminum. After playing with it a while and using at several 2-gun matches, I noticed that the optic seemed ever so slightly magnified. As you are looking through the sight with both eyes open, you can see a very minute difference in the size of the object you are looking at. I would later find out the Fastfire has a 1.07x magnification, which finally explained the difference I was seeing. The lenses on the Fastfire are polished and coated with a reflective material that is placed between the two lenses, making them super-resistant to scratches and abrasions. It also gives it an awesome red/orange reflective look. Due to its size, it's no surprise that the Fastfire has a small sight window, measuring in at 21mmx15mm (or .82"x.59"). However, it is still large enough to get that co-witness that we all seem to need when using an electronic sighting system. After all, batteries and electronics, in general, can fail…it's nice to have a back-up JIC. But what can I mount it to, you may ask? Burris claims that the Fastfire can withstand a 1000G force, so short of mounting it on a tomahawk or an Apollo rocket, I think you'd be ok. Now for the sight adjustment and information: According to Burris, the Fastfire is almost completely parallax-free from distances starting at 10 yards and out to 150 yards. Although I have used my Fastfire closer and further away than 10-150 yards, I did not notice a difference or an issue when firing at targets at these distances. The Fastfire seemed to remain true even when looking through the optic, even in the most awkward positions. The eye relief is unlimited on the Fastfire, which is why Burris has been able to make it usable on handguns, rifles, and pretty much on anything you wish to mount it to. When it comes to a rifle, mount it as close or as far away as you choose, you will still get the same performance either way. As far as sight adjustments go, the Fastfire has a 1 Minute of Angle (MOA) adjustment at 100 yards, which is pretty standard. When sighting in the optic at closer or further distances, simply subtract or add to your adjustments. As an example, if you are using your Fastfire for 50 yards and in, it will only be a half-inch difference. Pretty simple and easy math, especially if you suck at it as I do! The elevation and windage adjustments screws are found on the top and right side of the optic's body. To begin adjustments, you have first to loosen the two "lock" screws, found on the very back-end of the optic body. The Lock screws help keep the windage and elevation screws from moving on their own under strenuous activity or sustained fire. Actual adjustment is truly a pain in the rump, and it is the first time I have ever experience such a process to sight in an optic. Every Fastfire II comes with a "scale disc" which is a small white disc marked with black hash marks and text to help with windage and elevation adjustments. The disc has a hole in the very center so that you can insert the included screwdriver through to reach the adjustment screws underneath. To sight in your Fastfire, you have to take the scale disc, place it on either adjustment screw (windage or elevation) and use the provided screwdriver to make your adjustments. Not only is the disc small and hard to read, but there is no actual reference line marked on the body of the optic itself to help you keep track of what adjustments you are making. To remedy this, Burris says to use "any edge on the sight as a reference line." Meaning, we didn't mark it for you, so find an edge on the optic body and use it as your reference point yourself. But don't forget what edge you are using, or you will lose track of how much you have adjusted the screw. Depending on which adjustment screw you are using and which way you are trying to shift your point of impact, you will determine which way you spin the disc. Each hash mark on the disc is equal to a 1 MOA adjustment at 100 yards…just remember your changes when you are closer or further away from the target. After you have made your adjustments, re-tighten the lock screws to keep them in place. Although I know the Fastfire is small in design which makes typical adjustment procedures harder, I think this is a serious design flaw. So basically, if you want to make sure you can properly adjust your Fastfire in the field without guessing or over-tightening the screws, you have to carry this disc with you at all times. If you lose the disc, then what? While I'm sure, Burris would replace it, who would want to wait? In my opinion, Burris could have made this easier for the shooter while keeping in mind that sometimes adjustments have to be made in the field. Can you adjust it without? Sure, but it is tough, and adjustments are very, very small. *It should be noted that this feature was later improved on the Fastfire III model.* I learned this the hard way one day when I left my disc on my reloading desk before going out to sight in my Blackout rifle for the first time. I had been previously using the Fastfire on my SBR but removed it to continue testing on a different rifle. As I figured, when I got to the range and mounted the optic, it was not even close to being on paper…which I kind of expected. However, when I began to start making adjustments, I realized that I had forgotten the disc at home. I don't know about you, but 300 Blackout ammo isn't cheap or easy to come by in my area…whether you're talking reloaded or new commercial ammo. Long story short, I ended up wasting a ton of ammo while trying to make adjustments without the disc. I was surprised at how such a small movement of the screw changed the point of impact…thus the reason for the disc. FAIL. The easiest part of the Fastfire was the actual installation. Because I ordered the Fastfire with the AR-F3 mount, I set the basic mount aside. The optic body of the Fastfire simply rests on top of the AR-F3 mount. It comes with a small rubber gasket that looks like a mini oil pan gasket, which is placed between the mount and optic body. This thin gasket is the barrier between your optic's delicate internals and battery, which are located inside the body. You then insert the two Torx mounting screws and tighten each to 12-inch pounds for a solid mount and to ensure the gasket is squeezed tightly between the optic body and mount. With the gasket installed properly, Burris says that the Fastfire II is "100% sealed against water in normal use" and claims that it is submersible. I have to say that although I did not submerge mine during testing, I did see a few matches and range days with heavy afternoon showers. On several occasions, I had to wipe off the optic window to see clearly through it. It handled the rain and moisture like a champ and functioned flawlessly. Although many distributors and online stores advertise the Fastfire as having a "red dot," I assure you that it is amber in color without a doubt. The amber 4 MOA dot is clear and crisp and is easy to see even on the brightest days. The dot is powered by a single CR 2032 flat battery, which I am not very fond of. They are harder to find than standard batteries, and they are easily misplaced. Again, they're necessary due to the small size of the Fastfire. On a side note, even though it would probably work, Burris says NOT to use two CR 2016 batteries as a substitution for the CR 2032. As far as battery life goes, I have not seen anything definitive on run time or battery life of a single CR 2032. I think it just depends on not only your usage but your environment as well. What do I mean by the environment? Glad you asked because now we touch on one on my favorite features of this optic. The Fastfire II has a wonderful environmental light sensor that is located in the front of the optic. This is often a great feature that, for some unknown reason, seems to be left out of product descriptions and reviews on many websites. The optic automatically changes the brightness of the amber dot, depending on the amount of light you have around you. In other words, a bright day? High-intensity dot. Dark or lowlight setting? Low-intensity dot. I think this plays a huge role in battery life. The only thing I have seen written by Burris thus far is that in complete darkness on the lowest setting, the service life should last four years. With that being said, it makes perfect sense. I have owned my Fastfire for well over a year and have used it more times than I care to count, and I am still on battery #1. Not only that, but I have also accidentally left it on several times and placed it in my safe for weeks on end without depleting the battery. You know how it is! At times we get home from the range after a hot day, or we're in a hurry because the old' lady is rushing us home…it's simple. Sometimes you forget and leave it on. Well, with the Fastfire, I truly believe this is not an issue. But if you want to avoid this altogether, simply turn it into the "off" position with the on/off button, which is located on the left side of the unit. Now I want to talk about a few other small things that I always like to include in my reviews. Burris offers a one year "limited" warranty for the Fastfire. This is also ONLY extended to the "original owner." HOWEVER, I know from personal experience that Burris has more than excellent customer service and will do almost anything to make it right. If you are out purposely banging up your optic, they will probably tell you to go pound sand. But if you use it as you're supposed to, I don't think it would be an issue. The supplied owner's manual is clear and easy to read. It includes color photos and diagrams that are easy to understand. Manuals are often overlooked, but in my opinion, they are a valuable asset to make sure you are getting every inch out of your product. As much as I would love to talk about accuracy, the 4 MOA dot and close range design of the Fastfire were not made for precision work. Even if you have the most accurate match ammo in the world, being fired out of the finest barrel, you can only shoot with what you're limited to…and that's a 4 MOA dot. The individual shooter also makes a difference. Well, come to think of it, the biggest difference of all. Some of you reading this may say, "pffffft, I can shoot X's at 400 yards!" Well, good for you! Give yourself a big ole' pat on the back. I will stick to using my Fastfire in the way for which it was truly designed…for ultra-fast target acquisition, short-range work, with rugged reliability without sacrificing weight or room on my rail. Not to mention the Fastfire makes an excellent choice for a back-up optic on a rifle where you are using a magnified optic. Great choice! My use with the Fastfire II has been an epic journey, and I have enjoyed the ride. I have used this on all of my optics mountable rifles (mostly AR-15s) and even my M1A Socom II. The only issue is re-adjusting the optic for each rifle. Not the fact that you have to adjust because of the rifle itself, just the pain of dealing with the disc all over again. Other than that, the Fastfire has been a nice rugged little optic, especially for the price. In my opinion, this is a very affordable option for those of you on limited budgets (like me) that don't want to break the bank for a good reliable optic. My Fastfire is currently mounted to my Vltor SBR, where I intend to keep it after this review. My SBR is my short-range hottie, and the Fastfire II is a perfect match for what I use it for. And in reality, I think that is what optic selection is all about anyways. It's not about how much you paid, name brand, or "cool" factor; it simply comes down to what works best for you. Don't overthink it. Don't make a knee-jerk reaction; just pick an optic that fits the bill. For me, that was the Fastfire II. All in all, the Fastfire has been a great optic for the price and is still running hard. I expect to have several more years of good use out of this puppy until I upgrade or replace it. And to answer your question, I would repurchase it or use it on another rifle. Via ease of use, simplicity (minus a few small issues), weight and size, the Fastfire is a winner in my book. Pick one up and get to tearing up the range or woods soon! As always, have fun, be safe, and shoot on! -Michael Sapp

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    1 Total Reviews
    • 1