Front Sight Elevation Correction Chart

An accurate front sight elevation chart is essential in helping you properly aim at targets depending on their distances. A target that is 50 feet from you will require a different type of setting than one which is 500 yards from you, so having an accurate elevation chart will help you properly sight in the target.

An Example of How the Front Sight Elevation Correction Chart Works

Let’s suppose that there is 24” sighting radius between the front and receiver sight of your rifle. Even when the rear sight is set as low as possible, the rifle still shoots 6” high at a range of 100 yards. In order to make the proper correction, you will need to do the following;

Remove the front sight and use a micrometer to measure the overall height. In this example, it might be .410” which might be a Marble No. 41N. Now, refer to the columns for 24” and 6” and you will see that the suggested correction will be .400. So, when resetting the front sight back into place, it should be set at a new height of .450” to account for the difference. In other words, the .410” of the overall height plus the .040” for the corrected height would be proper. In this case, a Marble No. 45N should be used instead in order to provide the proper height.

How to Properly Sight the Rifle

It takes a little more than just simple measuring in order to get the sights properly adjusted for the distance in which you want to shoot. There are certain measures that you will need to take in order for the new sights to be accurately placed.

Benchrest or Prone Position for Sighting: Basically, you want to have the rifle in a secure position when you do your sighting. This means having it in a benchrest or if you are prone on the ground for maximum support. A sandbag or other type of rest is also recommended as well to provide the steadiness needed for accurate sighting.

Secure Rifle Barrel with your Hand: A common mistake is to rest the barrel of the rifle or your forearm when in a prone position on a solid surface. Instead, you should put the back of your hand or even your wrist on the resting point and hold the forearm of the rifle secure in your hand instead. You should use about the same grip tightness as you would if firing at a running target.

Otherwise, resting the forearm or barrel directly on the solid surface such as a sandbag for example will cause the rifle to shoot even higher. This effect, sometimes called a “muzzle flip” will in essence rise up your rifle at the point when you are shooting. Securing the barrel or forearm with your hand will prevent this from happening.

By using the Front Sight Elevation Correction Chart and the proper techniques when sighting in your target, this will allow you can shoot more accurately over longer distances.

Distance Between Front & Rear Sights
14″
15″
16″
17″
18″
19″
20″
21″
22″
23″
AMOUNT OF ADJUSTMENT NECESSARY TO CORRECT ERROR
Amount
Of Error
At
100 Yards
Given In
Inches
1″ .0038 .0041 .0044 .0047 .0050 .0053 .0055 .0058 .0061 .0064
2″ .0078 .0083 .0089 .0094 .0100 .0105 .0111 .0116 .0122 .0127
3″ .0117 .0125 .0133 .0142 .0150 .0159 .0167 .0175 .0184 .0192
4″ .0155 .0167 .0178 .0189 .0200 .0211 .0222 .0234 .0244 .0255
5″ .0194 .0208 .0222 .0236 .0250 .0264 .0278 .0292 .0306 .0319
6″ .0233 .0250 .0267 .0283 .0300 .0317 .0333 .0350 .0367 .0384

 

 

Distance Between Front & Rear Sights
24″
25″
26″
27″
28″
29″
30″
31″
32″
33″
34″
Amount
Of Error
At
100 Yards
Given In
Inches
1″ .0066 .0069 .0072 .0074 .0077 .0080 .0082 .0085 .0088 .0091 .0093
2″ .0133 .0138 .0144 .0149 .0155 .0160 .0156 .0171 .0177 .0182 .0188
3″ .0201 .0209 .0217 .0226 .0234 .0243 .0251 .0259 .0268 .0276 .0285
4″ .0266 .0278 .0289 .0300 .0311 .0322 .0333 .0344 .0355 .0366 .0377
5″ .0333 .0347 .0361 .0375 .0389 .0403 .0417 .0431 .0445 .0458 .0472
6″ .0400 .0417 .0434 .0450 .0467 .0484 .0500 .05175 .0534 .0551 .0567

 

 

 

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